Straighten up and fly right…

lockheed_c-130_hercules

On lessons learned late…

Ever have one of those moments when you realize you were super slow on the uptake? I have had ever so many of them. It’s like I have all these awesome teachers and life lessons from mentors/leaders/friends/etc, and yet somehow the message never sinks in until I’ve royally screwed something up. This is a pattern I have. It’s been going on for years.  Of course, the first time I really became aware of it was a shock to me and came from my mother.

I was in Nav School, and I think I’d had my first (or only?) failed check ride. I don’t remember exactly, but I’m pretty sure it came during the radar phase of training, phase three. I was on the phone talking to my mom about it, hoping she’d cheer me up and instead, these words came out.

“You can’t just slide by in this like you did in college. You’ll fail. This is real life here.”

Wait, what? How could she say something like that? What was wrong with my college career? I’d been super on top of things my first two years. Perhaps even in over my head a bit what with crew, ROTC, band and choir, a work-study job, and an overload nearly every quarter. What did she mean slip by? I worked my tail off – staying up to finish projects till midnight then getting up at 4am and hitting the river for 3 hours, coming back, going to work, then class, then homework, right up until midnight the next night. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Of course, once I knew my ROTC place was secure, had received my scholarship and stipend, and then determined that I’d get an aircrew assignment after I graduated; I’ll admit, I did slack. Too mudiploma-pixabaych. I loved and respected my primary professors and thoroughly enjoyed the subject matter of my major and minor courses, and yet, they were easy for me. So, while I worked hard-ish on my few remaining core courses, I’ll admit, I took advantage of the ease of the Spanish and communications courses, and of my professors’ good faith based on my earlier performance in their courses. Still, my mother shouldn’t have known any of that, I’d never given her details.

My second “lesson learned late” moment came near the end of my Air Force career. I chose to separate honorably. I’d served my time, and opted out of an assignment that was just a bit too late in coming. Of course, my aha moment came a little bit before this, maybe 6 months to a year earlier.

I had somehow ended up on the fast track to a good Air Force career. I didn’t consciously intend to end up there, but I had taken my mother’s warning to heart and repackaged it as “straighten up and fly right.” So, as I had never been one to back down from a challenge that was handed to me, and  was a people pleaser who in some ways lived to serve, I did well in the military. However,  I was probably one who over-volunteered and had a pattern of doing so.

On the second day of field training (the officer’s version of basic), I found myself stepping up to take over the position of Flight Physical Training Officer when the cadet who was intended for it injured his back and had to withdraw from training. Our Officer in Charge (OIC) called us all together and told us what had happened and then asked for a volunteer to take over. As you may imagine, crickets. He asked again, and then again, and finally, I rolled my eyes and said I would do it. I was not cut out for it truly, and I think my OIC knew this, but when he asked if I could handle it, strong rower that I was, I said I could. I was fit, sure, but didn’t really know how to train others. He gave me the benefit of the doubt and the group PTO who happened to be assigned to our flight helped me out a lot. A week or two in though, another cadet emerged as far better prepared for the job and he took over while I moved on to something else.

Later, after arriving at my second permanent base after flight training, I was moved quite quickly from just being one of the squadron navigators to flight commander (CC) for 11 of the guys. I happened to be one of the more senior navs in the squadron, so while it volunteers-pixabaycaught me by surprise, it wasn’t all that unexpected. My mentor in this case gave me the bare minimums of a briefing on what was required – showed me how to use the computer software needed to manage the paperwork that went along with the position, imparted his impressions of my guys and then took off for another duty title. I lasted a few months and did fine from my superiors’ perspective, but when a position for a squadron executive officer opened up I asked for volunteers from my guys as instructed. When none appeared, I again stepped up to the plate martyr-like and took what I knew was a not-very-desirable-job from the flyer’s perspective.

Similarly, after the squadron drawdown due to BRAC was underway, my boss came to me and asked if I wanted to be the Wing Air Force Assistance Fundraiser Officer. I absolutely did not, but again, my eager to please and live-to-serve attitude kicked in and I accepted. It was just as tough as I’d imagined, but I managed to do well enough to later be offered a position at the group level doing a lot of the same things I’d been doing as a squadron exec. Again, I worked hard, but I got so caught up in the details that I was taken aback a year later when my boss came to me and said he was bringing up another airman from my squadron because he wanted to be able to mentor someone who intended to stay in.

That comment finally made it click. I’d been doing all the things a good follower should do, and somehow performed well enough in the leadership positions I was given to please those above me. But, the heart of the positions didn’t reveal itself to me until that conversation. As a leader, it wasn’t really my job to be volunteering for all the “un-wanted” jobs. Instead, I should have been getting to know my own people and grooming them for or sometimes pushing them into positions that while not necessarily flyer-desirable would be good for their growth, fit them, and benefit their career. Leadership isn’t just about being able to “straighten up and fly right,” it’s about taking time to mentor, to learn about, and then to encourage in the right direction.  I’d learned all about leadership during ROTC in college and field training, yet somehow, I didn’t truly comprehend those lessons until it was almost after the fact.20160709_120136

More recently, I recognized a missed lesson when I started a creative writing course after grad school. I was a media communications major in college with a focus on video production. As mentioned, I thoroughly enjoyed the material we covered in classes. It was very practical, hands-on, and fun. I especially loved being behind the camera – framing, calling shots live, and editing after the fact. My final project for video production was to make a short film. The idea (I now realize) was to apply everything we’d learned over our four years from story-boarding to screen-writing to selecting actors, directing production, filming, and then finally editing in post-process.

I decided to do a music video to one of my favorite songs, Be Still by the Newsboys. I took a video camera with me on a trip to our family farm in Nebraska and filmed some scenes of my sister and cousin in the snow. I think I forgot the story-board part, or did it after the fact. At any rate, I got hung up mostly on the post-production and editing part. This was in the earlier days of AVID’s video editing, long before iMovie and Movie Maker had become ubiquitous. I was, true-to-form, working late the night before it was due – so late that Campus Safety kicked me out of the editing lab and sent me home. I thought I’d recorded my tightly edited work well, but didn’t have time to check it. I submitted it the next day, and was chagrined to get the feedback from my prof that it was a blank tape. I’d saved my work on the hard drive of the computer as well, but the day it was due, the football team came in and deleted everything, so they’d have space to edit their end-of-season video. My prof gave me grace, I’d always done pretty good work for him in the past, and assigned me a passing grade, which looking back I may not have fully deserved despite the hours of work.

dsc_8445My first creative writing conference in 2014 taught me that my problem then as now has always been plot. I’m good, or at least decent, at capturing scenes or moments, in writing as well as in film. Blending those moments into something more coherent that demonstrates character growth and entrances the reader or viewer however?  Well, that’s not my strong suit. Sure, I can have a vague idea of where I want my characters to get to in the end – sometimes, but getting them there…um, not so much. It’s not my professors’ fault, this lack of mine. My media prof did everything right. I remember my notes, impressions, and respect for him and his work. And, while I was enrolled in his courses I’m sure that I was really trying to apply those principles. I think though that here too, I got bogged down in the details and lost the big picture.

I just sent an extremely rough and incomplete first draft to a dear writing friend of mine and as I clicked send, I realized that even though I’ve now “learned” this lesson about plot, it’s extremely hard to put into practice. Although I don’t think I’ve screwed up beyond repair yet, I’ll admit it is disheartening. But, contrary to the lessons learned post-college and post-AF; I’m not post-leading, post-learning, post-writing. I’m just beginning these really. So, it’s time to “straighten up and fly right” once again and keep working to really implement these going forward. Thanks to all the teachers, mentors, and friends – writing and otherwise, who keep imparting lessons as we walk through life. As my wise mother often says, “please (continue to) be patient with me, God isn’t finished with me yet.”

Relationship Rules – Student Creations

So I just had to share the gallery of creations my students came up with. We had a discussion in class about gender and machismo and I gave them a follow-up assignment to create 5 Relationship Rules and share them in a poem, song, rap, cartoon, poster, etc.  I love giving students creative freedom – the results always make me smile. Here are some of the simple but wise submissions from my pre-med students! Enjoy!  Please forgive the shadows on some of the pictures.

A Single Gal’s Guide to Condo Ownership:When it rains, it pours

Two months after I closed on the cutest condo ever in a 9-unit converted Manor House from the early 1900’s, it began raining inside.

Kitchen post-storm

Kitchen post-storm

First lesson learned: If a home inspector mentions in passing that a kitchen must have had water damage “at some time in the past,” do everything in your power to verify that it well and truly was IN THE PAST!

mixing bowls

Tip 1: Always have lots of big bowls  and pitchers on hand ready to be pressed into alternative service.

Loud crashes in the night never bode well.

 

Warranty

Tip 2: Prominently display home warranty company and insurance company phone numbers.

Somewhere water-damage-free is preferable.

 

 

 

Industrial strength fans are ever so effective – but noisy.

 

 Tip #3: Be patient with the repair crew – especially if wood floors are involved.

Two months can definitely feel LONG though.

 

 

 

 

 Tip #4: Remember, when it rains, it pours.

While beautiful outdoors - indoor waterfalls are terrifying.

While beautiful outdoors – indoor waterfalls are terrifying.

 

Office mates may be perplexed when bins are removed.

Office mates may be perplexed when bins are removed.

Tip #5: Have a nearby friend or neighbor on speed dial.

One with access to trash cans and recycling bins is a bonus!

 

 

 

 

Clear signage is imperative!

Clear signage is imperative!

  Tip #6a: When moving into a new place, discover where the Water Shut-off valves are ASAP.  Especially if you have neighbors on the same line.

#6b: Keep wine handy for overwrought resident experts 😉 A glass or two does wonders for stress levels!

 

 

The power of water in enclosed spaces

The power of water in enclosed spaces

Tip #7: Never ever delete or throw away disaster restoration and repair company numbers. Always be polite with the dispatcher, even when you’re running low on patience.

Tip #8: Be polite to the insurance company as well. If you find a good one – stick with it!

Tip #9:  Home Warranty companies may be useless in a true emergency – especially if the emergency company you use is the priciest in the phone book.

 

 

Tip #10: Laughter is ALWAYS the best medicine!  While a     momentary panic is perfectly understandable – shift into survival mode quickly.

After all, what good does screaming do when there’s a six-foot wall of water crashing down around you!

 

Sometimes all you can do is laugh and expect the unexpected.  It could almost always be worse!  Take a breath, control what you can, and enjoy the ride! 

bubbles laughter - child

Thanks to Blogging 101 – Day 19 post about “New to you post formats” and to classmates who encouraged me to try a different style with my “flash non-fiction” assignment.

 

Digital Learning? Digital Promise? Digital ELC?

Informal Learning by Shareski – Creative Commons

I was recently doing some catching up on reading about Education in the News, sparked by the BBC story about Global Education’s WISE laurete  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15546976 , and then added to based on  TESOL bulletin info and so on. While reading, I came across a series of articles about digital learning and digital education.  As this has been a rather difficult quarter with many “battles” often focusing on disrespectful use of mobile devices and computers in the classroom, it’s a topic that has been on my mind for awhile lately.

In my Master’s program from the Monterey Institute of International Studies, I spent a lot of time working with and learning about Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) and educational technology and ways to use technology effectively in the classroom.  I am still very interested in the digital world and how to make use of it. I would not consider myself and early adapter (most technology is too expensive for me to jump right on) but I like to have some idea  about what is out there and what is available. I also believe that many of the digital tools such as mobile devices and online dictionaries can be very helpful for students.  However, the program that I teach with now has a somewhat convoluted relationship with technology in the classroom. In previous quarters we did not have much access to technology, now we have more. Additionally, many of my colleagues have been burned by students cheating while using technology. Because of this, it’s a continually changing relationship. Continue reading

Critical Thinking 101?

So I was trying to grade my students’ reading exams today. An exam, btw, that my colleague and I came up with together. As I started looking at the first person’s exam, I realized that I wasn’t entirely sure that I could even answer all the questions so I went back and took the test myself.

One of the questions we asked was, “create 2 critical thinking questions using either when, why, or how.”  – A task that we’ve done some in class.  Anyway, it occurred to me as I was taking the test, that I’m not totally sure I know what “critical thinking” questions are.  It’s a term we throw around in education circles quite freely. And it comes up often in skill team meetings and I nod along with everyone else and agree that “oh yes, our students need to work on critical thinking” but, what does that mean exactly?

So, I googled it. Here’s at least one resource that came up that might lead to others, I’ll try to add more in a bit, but here’s some food for thought to start with. …

http://www.criticalthinking.org/aboutCT/CTquestionsAnswers.cfm

Here’s another, more in brief:
http://www.criticalthinking.org/aboutCT/ourConceptCT.cfm

Back in a bit, after I finish grading a few more tests.